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13. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Introduction

13.1 In recent years, the issues of environmental pollution and human health have come increasingly to the fore, and Government guidance and planning policies are developing to address these issues. In setting a strong regeneration agenda for the area to meet the economic and social needs of local people, the Council is also keen to ensure that the environmental quality of the area is maintained and enhanced, both for local residents and visitors, and to encourage inward investment.

13.2 The allocation of sites in this Local Plan for particular purposes should not be taken as an indication that they are free of the physical/hazard constraints addressed in this Chapter, or that they are not in the vicinity of gas transmission pipelines/other installations handling hazardous substances.

13.3 Information regarding sites known or suspected to have problems of ground instability is included on the basis of the best information available to the District Council. It is not necessarily exhaustive, and responsibility for determining the extent and effect of such constraints remains that of the developer.

OBJECTIVES

(1) TO MAINTAIN THE OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF THE DISTRICT;

(2) TO ENSURE THAT DEVELOPMENT IS ONLY PERMITTED WHERE THE DISTRICT COUNCIL IS SATISFIED THAT ADVERSE PHYSICAL AND OTHER CONDITIONS LIKELY TO AFFECT HUMAN HEALTH AND SAFETY, OR THE ENVIRONMENT ARE NOT PRESENT OR CAN BE SATISFACTORILY OVERCOME;

(3) TO SAFEGUARD NOISE SENSITIVE DEVELOPMENT FROM THE EFFECT OF AIRCRAFT NOISE; AND

(4) TO PREVENT DEVELOPMENT THAT WOULD BE AT RISK OF FLOODING OR THAT WOULD REPRESENT AN UNACCEPTABLE RISK TO GROUNDWATER SOURCES.

Strategic Policy Background

13.4 PPG23 states that the planning system and the pollution control systems are separate, but complementary, in their operation. The planning system should not therefore operate so as to duplicate controls that are the statutory responsibility of other bodies. The complementary role of the planning system is to:

(1) regulate the location of development and control operations in order to avoid or minimise the adverse effects on the use of land and on the environment; and 

(2) regulate what happens after any development or use of land, so that land and water resources are restored to such a condition so as to be capable of the agreed after use, once any development or use of land has ceased.

13.5 The Regional Planning Guidance for the South East recognises that the quality of the Region's environment is underpinned by the key elements of land, air and water.

13.6 The Kent Structure Plan also seeks to avoid or minimise the pollution impacts of new development and opposes development where such impacts cannot be reduced to an acceptable level (Policy ENV20).

Potentially Polluting Development

13.7 The detailed characteristics of activities with potential to pollute are controlled by wide ranging powers under pollution control legislation. However, the effect of potentially polluting development on use of land can be a material planning consideration in exercising planning controls. The District Council as local planning authority will require any application to contain sufficient information to enable the risk of pollution to be assessed. In considering applications for development with potential to pollute or for housing/other development sensitive to pollution from existing sources, the District Council will consult the relevant pollution control authorities.

13.8 The following Policy does not apply to land use planning matters relating to waste management, for which relevant policies and proposals are set out in the Waste Local Plan prepared by the County Council. With the exception of possible waste management proposals, the District Council is not aware of a need to identify sites to meet specific requirements for potentially polluting development within the Local Plan period. Accordingly, the following criteria-based Policy will apply in respect of any such proposals that may arise.

POLICY EP1 POTENTIALLY POLLUTING DEVELOPMENT

DEVELOPMENT WITH POTENTIAL TO POLLUTE WILL BE PERMITTED ONLY WHERE:

(1) APPLICABLE STATUTORY POLLUTION CONTROLS AND SITING WILL EFFECTIVELY AND ADEQUATELY MINIMISE IMPACT UPON LAND USE AND ENVIRONMENT INCLUDING THE EFFECTS ON HEALTH, THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT OR GENERAL AMENITY RESULTING FROM RELEASE OF POLLUTANTS TO WATER, LAND OR AIR, OR FROM NOISE, DUST, VIBRATION, LIGHT OR HEAT; AND

(2) ACCEPTABLE AND ADEQUATE RESTORATION PROPOSALS WILL BE SECURED SO THAT LAND IS CAPABLE OF AN APPROPRIATE AFTER-USE. 

IN DETERMINING INDIVIDUAL PROPOSALS, REGARD WILL BE PAID TO:

(3) THE ECONOMIC AND WIDER SOCIAL NEED FOR THE DEVELOPMENT; AND 

(4) THE VISUAL IMPACT OF MEASURES NEEDED TO COMPLY WITH ANY STATUTORY ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY STANDARDS OR OBJECTIVES.

PERMISSION FOR DEVELOPMENT WHICH IS SENSITIVE TO POLLUTION WILL BE PERMITTED ONLY WHERE THE DISTRICT COUNCIL IS SATISFIED THAT IT IS SUFFICIENTLY WELL SEPARATED FROM ANY EXISTING OR POTENTIAL SOURCE OF POLLUTION AS TO REDUCE POLLUTION IMPACT UPON HEALTH, THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT OR GENERAL AMENITY TO AN ACCEPTABLE LEVEL.

Landfill Gas

13.9 Sites that have been used for the deposit of refuse or waste may generate explosive or otherwise harmful gases. The District Council intends to ensure as far as practical that where development may be proposed at or near sites which have been so used, effective measures will be secured to prevent any hazard during construction and subsequent occupation of the development.

13.10 The Environment Agency, as waste regulation authority, holds a register of landfill sites, holds a Landfill Atlas, which identifies all known landfill sites. These are not featured on the Local Plan Proposals Map. The District Council is required to consult the Environment Agency as Waste Regulation Authority before granting consent for development within 250m of land which is or has within 30 years of the relevant planning application, been used for the deposit of refuse or waste (the local environmental health division Environmental Health Department will also be consulted).

13.11 If an application for a new development/redevelopment or major change of use on or adjacent to a site included on the landfill register (also known as the landfill atlas) in the Atlas is received, then the District Council will usually require such application to be accompanied by a full site investigation report including gas monitoring.

13.12 Where presence of gas is discovered or it is suspected that it may be present during site development, the District Council will require the applicant to arrange for an investigation to be carried out to determine its source and for satisfactory and effective remedial measures to prevent hazards from migrating gas (including accumulation into property or other confined spaces) during the course of development and during subsequent use of the site. Specialist design and construction advice will usually have to be sought by the developer in this regard.

POLICY EP2 LANDFILL SITES

ON OR NEAR LANDFILL SITES OR WHERE THERE IS OTHERWISE REASON TO SUSPECT THAT POTENTIAL DANGER FROM EVOLVING OR MIGRATING GAS MAY BE PRESENT, DEVELOPMENT OR REDEVELOPMENT, INCLUDING CHANGE OF USE, WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED WHERE:

(1) THE APPLICANT/DEVELOPER HAS DEMONSTRATED EITHER THAT THERE IS NO DANGER FROM EVOLVING OR MIGRATING GAS OR THAT RELIABLE ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE MADE TO OVERCOME SUCH DANGER; AND

(2) ANY NECESSARY REMEDIAL MEASURES CAN BE ACHIEVED WITHOUT UNACCEPTABLE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT.

THE DISTRICT COUNCIL WILL SEEK BY AGREEMENT OR BY IMPOSITION OF CONDITIONS ON ANY CONSENT FOR DEVELOPMENT, TO ENSURE MANAGEMENT OF GAS FROM CLOSED LANDFILL, AND THAT SUITABLE PRECAUTIONS ARE TAKEN IN CONSTRUCTION METHODS TOGETHER WITH ANY OTHER ARRANGEMENTS CONSIDERED NECESSARY TO SAFEGUARD AGAINST HAZARDS ASSOCIATED WITH LANDFILL GAS.

Unstable Land

13.13 Ground stability hazards and their effect on proposed development or a neighbouring area is an important issue that the District Council will take into account in determining planning applications.

13.14 It is in the developer's own interests to investigate whether proposed development land is stable. In addition to the obvious dangers of damage to buildings and structures and possible injury

13.15 The marshes (including the general area of Minster Marshes, Monkton Marshes, Sarre Marshes and Wade Marshes) are an area known to the District Council where problems of ground instability are likely to be present.

13.16 Other sites which might comprise unstable ground include coastal strips; particularly where serious erosion is evident, land overlying the extensive Ramsgate caves and the Margate caves near Zion Place, and land overlying the disused railway tunnel (indicated on a Ordnance Survey Map) and extending between Ramsgate Main Sands and the railway line at Broadstairs near its junction with Salisbury Avenue.

13.17 Stability problems are also known to affect land (indicated on the Proposals Map) at Dane Valley Road, Margate. Sites identified as ‘landfills’ or ‘areas of unknown fill’ featured in the Landfill Atlas would also require particular consideration of the likelihood of instability. The landfill register is one source of reference. However, as the local authority contaminated land inspection process progresses additional information is likely to become available. However, this is only one source of reference, and Even with these sources of information, instability may affect other sites not known to the District Council.

13.18 In considering applications for development on land where known or suspected instability might render it unsuitable for development or could adversely affect it or neighbouring land, the District Council may require a specialist investigation and assessment arranged by the developer to determine stability and to identify any remedial measures required to deal with instability in order to determine the application.

13.19 Before requesting specialist information, the District Council will normally endeavour to provide some informal indication as to the relative importance of land stability in relation to other planning considerations to the likely outcome of the application.

POLICY EP3 UNSTABLE LAND

IN CONSIDERING PLANNING APPLICATIONS FOR DEVELOPMENT ON LAND WHICH KNOWN OR SUSPECTED INSTABILITY MIGHT RENDER UNSUITABLE FOR DEVELOPMENT, THE DISTRICT COUNCIL MAY REQUIRE A SPECIALIST INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT BY THE DEVELOPER TO DETERMINE STABILITY AND TO IDENTIFY ANY REMEDIAL MEASURES REQUIRED TO DEAL WITH IT BEFORE DETERMINING SUCH PLANNING APPLICATIONS.

DEVELOPMENT WILL BE RESISTED WHERE:

(1) INSTABILITY IS JUDGED BY THE DISTRICT COUNCIL TO BE SUCH THAT THE GROUND IS CONSIDERED UNSUITABLE TO ACCOMMODATE THE DEVELOPMENT PROPOSED;

(2) THE DEVELOPMENT WOULD, BY REASON OF GROUND INSTABILITY, ADVERSELY AFFECT NEIGHBOURING LAND; OR

(3) WHERE NECESSARY REMEDIAL MEASURES CANNOT BE CARRIED OUT WITHOUT UNACCEPTABLE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT.

WHERE THE DISTRICT COUNCIL IS SATISFIED THAT GROUND INSTABILITY CAN BE OVERCOME, PLANNING CONSENT MAY BE GRANTED SUBJECT TO CONDITIONS OR A LEGAL AGREEMENT SPECIFYING THE NECESSARY MEASURES TO BE CARRIED OUT.

Derelict & Contaminated Land

13.20 Part IIA of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 requires local authorities to prepare a strategy to identify and deal with contaminated land in their area. This strategy is to be based on the "suitable for use" principle. The application of this principle is to ensure that contaminated sites are the subject of the appropriate level of remediation to render them suitable for a particular end use. The Council is involved, with the Environment Agency and Kent County Council, in a multi-agency approach to ensure that all contaminated land is identified and remdiated where required to develop a contaminated land strategy for the district.

13.21 The new contaminated land regime involves three elements:

(1) preparation of a strategy for the identification, prioritisation and investigation of potentially contaminated land, which satisfies the requirements of the DETR DEFRA and the Environment Agency; 

(2) review of the districts land use, both historic and current, investigation of the district, and the historic use of land, for contamination and the identification of sites which may be unsuitable for their current use identification of designated contaminated land sites; and 

(3) remediation of sites that are identified as contaminated land. designation of ‘unsuitable for use’ sites as contaminated land, and remediation of these designated sites to make them suitable for the current or proposed use.

13.22 The Local Authority is required to produce its Contaminated Land Strategy by the end of June 2001. Clearly, there will be land-use implications arising from the development of the strategy, which will need to be reflected in the Local Plan in an appropriate manner. 
A Contaminated Land Strategy has been produced by the council’s Environmental Services department in line with government requirements. This provides guidance for the identification, inspection, assessment and remediation of land which may be designated as Contaminated Land. The strategy is aimed at developers, land and property owners, members of the general public and as a reference document for council employees.

13.23 Contamination of land can arise from previous use such as sewage works, industrial purposes and use for domestic or industrial landfill. Contamination can cause health and safety hazards to persons working on land and to occupiers and users of land or buildings, the buildings themselves and water services. In Thanet, the protection of groundwater sources is a particular concern in relation to contaminated land, and this will be a key issue in assessing contamination hazards and risks.

13.24 Contamination is subject to controls under pollution control legislation. However, contamination or potential for it can be a material planning consideration where proposed use/development might pose unacceptable risks to health or the environment. The District Council wishes to encourage recycling of "brownfield" sites, including, where practical, to bring derelict/contaminated sites back to beneficial use. 

13.25 Where contamination is known or suspected, the developer will usually want to arrange for an investigation to assess site conditions, the nature of any hazards and to establish how the development might be designed to minimise risk. Sites which are believed to be landfills featured in the Landfill Atlas would also require specific consideration of the likelihood of contamination. However, this is only one source of reference, and contamination may affect other sites not known to the District Council. The Landfill Register However, this is only one source of reference, and contamination may affect other sites not known to the District Council. As the Contaminated Land Strategy is implemented it is expected that the Local Authority will gather additional information relating to land quality and historical use within the district. This information will be used in association with the landfill register as and when it becomes available.

13.26 In determining planning applications relating to sites likely to be affected by contamination, the District Council will take into account the suitability of the site for the particular purpose proposed, and whether proper account is taken of known or potential contamination. In assessing remediation and restoration proposals, the District Council will take into account the need to protect the value of natural habitats present within subject contamination sites.

13.27 In cases where contamination is known or strongly suspected to affect a proposed development site, an appropriate investigation will be required by the District Council prior to determination of the planning application. Such an investigation should identify any contamination and any remedial measures required to deal with the hazards, and should be provided by the applicant as part of the application.

13.28 In this context, an "appropriate investigation" would involve the preparation of an investigation strategy to be agreed with the District Planning Authority and the Environment Agency before any investigation work is carried out. This is to ensure that any investigation methods used will not in themselves result in contamination risks, either to human health, other land or any underlying groundwater resources. All investigation works must be carried out in compliance with the latest British Standards, and industry best practice.

13.29 The District Council will consult any department/body it considers appropriate to establish the significance of contamination and the suitability and adequacy of any safeguarding measures proposed. Where measures are necessary to safeguard against contamination hazards, planning permission may be granted subject to conditions that such measures will be carried out. 

13.30 In the event that contamination is unexpectedly discovered during site development, developers and landowners are strongly advised to contact both the Council’s Environmental Protection Team, which has powers of intervention in relation to contaminated land generally, and the Environment Agency, which has powers of intervention in relation to groundwater protection. In these circumstances, the Environmental Protection Team will require a site assessment and any appropriate mitigation measures to ensure that the site is suitable for the proposed end use.

POLICY EP4 DERELICT & CONTAMINATED LAND

DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS THAT WOULD ENABLE DERELICT OR CONTAMINATED SITES TO BE BROUGHT INTO BENEFICIAL USE WILL NORMALLY BE PERMITTED, SO LONG AS THE SITES CAN BE RENDERED SUITABLE FOR THE PROPOSED END USE IN TERMS OF THE IMPACT ON HUMAN HEALTH, PUBLIC SAFETY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, INCLUDING UNDERLYING GROUNDWATER RESOURCES.

DEVELOPMENT ON LAND KNOWN OR SUSPECTED TO BE CONTAMINATED OR LIKELY TO BE ADVERSELY AFFECTED BY SUCH CONTAMINATION WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED WHERE:

(1) AN APPROPRIATE SITE INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT (AGREED BY THE LOCAL PLANNING AUTHORITY) HAS BEEN CARRIED OUT AS PART OF THE APPLICATION TO ESTABLISH WHETHER CONTAMINATION IS PRESENT AND TO IDENTIFY ANY REMEDIAL MEASURES NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT THE SITE IS SUITABLE FOR THE PROPOSED END USE;

(2) THE PROPOSED REMEDIAL MEASURES WOULD BE ACCEPTABLE IN PLANNING TERMS AND WOULD PROVIDE EFFECTIVE SAFEGUARDS AGAINST CONTAMINATION HAZARDS DURING THE DEVELOPMENT AND SUBSEQUENT OCCUPATION OF THE SITE.

PLANNING CONDITIONS WILL BE ATTACHED TO ANY CONSENT TO ENSURE THAT REMEDIAL MEASURES ARE FULLY IMPLEMENTED.

IN THE CASE OF SITES WHERE CONTAMINATION IS ONLY CONSIDERED TO BE A POSSIBLE RISK, A SITE INVESTIGATION WILL NORMALLY BE REQUIRED BY CONDITION.

Hazardous Substances

13.31 The siting of installations handling hazardous substances will be the subject of planning controls aimed at keeping these separate from housing and other land uses with which such installations might be incompatible in terms of safety. The area covered by this Local Plan already contains a number of installations handling hazardous substances, including high pressure, natural gas transmission pipelines. Whilst these are subject to stringent controls under existing health and safety

13.32 The District Council as local planning authority will seek the advice of the Health and Safety Executive about off-site risks to the public arising from any proposed development which would introduce one or more hazardous substances.

13.33 In determining applications for development on land which is in the vicinity of one or more installations handling hazardous substances, the District Council as local planning authority will take account of advice from the Health and Safety Executive about risks to the proposed development from the installation/s*.

13.34 Under the present system of control over hazardous development and over development within the vicinity of hazardous installations, the activities, substances and quantities to which the above applies are defined by the Planning (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 1992, and Department of the Environment Circular 11/92.

Air Quality

13.35 In general terms, Thanet enjoys good air quality. The Environment Act 1995 created new duties for local authorities in dealing with poor air quality. The National Air Quality Strategy, published in 1997, identifies the planning system as one of the key means of improving local air quality. Circular 15/97 provides guidance on Air Quality and Land Use Planning. 

13.36 All local authorities are required to carry out at least a First Stage Air Quality Review and Assessment. This involves a general review and assessment of the eight national priority pollutants in relation to the national air quality objectives. If it is concluded, on the basis of local circumstances and professional judgement, that there is the potential that one or more of the air quality objectives may not be reached, a Second Stage Review and Assessment is required.

13.37 The Second Stage requires the use of simple monitoring and modelling techniques to estimate the levels of the various air pollutants, which should provide a quantitative assessment of whether the air quality may be met or not. The Third Stage Review & Assessment involves detailed monitoring and modelling with the aim of estimating the magnitude and geographical extent of potential air quality exceedances. If the Third Stage indicates that the air quality objectives will not be fully met, local authorities are required, under the 1995 Act, to identify Air Quality Management Areas (AQMAs) and prepare an Air Quality Action Plan.

13.38 In the case of Thanet, the Second Stage Review and Assessment indicated that there were unlikely to be any such exceedances, and subsequently no AQMAs have been identified. However, a further review and assessment of air quality is required by the end of 2003. This should reflect any changes in air quality resulting from variations in traffic flows, the development of London Manston Airport and the business parks and any technological advances that might result in lower levels of pollution. This may require a review of Local Plan policies relating to air quality at that time.

13.39 The current Government guidance makes it clear that air quality is nevertheless a "material consideration" in dealing with development proposals and the following policy will be applied where there is a risk that a particular proposal might cause the national air quality objectives to be exceeded.

POLICY EP5 LOCAL AIR QUALITY MONITORING

PROPOSALS FOR NEW DEVELOPMENT THAT WOULD RESULT IN THE NATIONAL AIR QUALITY OBJECTIVES BEING EXCEEDED WILL NOT NORMALLY BE PERMITTED.

DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS THAT MIGHT LEAD TO SUCH AN EXCEEDANCE, OR TO A SIGNIFICANT DETERIORATION IN LOCAL AIR QUALITY RESULTING IN UNACCEPTABLE EFFECTS ON HUMAN HEALTH, LOCAL AMENITY OR THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT, WILL REQUIRE THE SUBMISSION OF AN AIR QUALITY ASSESSMENT, WHICH SHOULD ADDRESS:

(1) THE EXISTING BACKGROUND LEVELS OF AIR POLLUTION;
(2) THE LIKELY IMPACT OF THE PROPOSED USE WITHIN THAT CONTEXT;
(3) WHETHER THERE ARE ANY MITIGATION MEASURES THAT WOULD PREVENT THE NATIONAL AIR QUALITY OBJECTIVES BEING EXCEEDED OR REDUCE THE EXTENT OF AIR QUALITY DETERIORATION.

Noise Pollution

13.40 In August 2000, a Draft Framework Directive on the Assessment and Reduction of Environmental Noise was published by the European Commission. This involves a proposal for environmental noise mapping to assess background noise levels and the noise impacts of new development.

13.41 There would be a requirement for local authorities to carry out noise mapping and produce noise reduction action plans for large urban areas and major noise generators. This requirement comes into force during the Plan period. Once the detailed requirements are known, this may trigger the need for a partial review of the Local Plan.

13.42 In the meantime, the control of noise through the planning system is addressed by PPG24, which states that noise, including aircraft noise, can be a material consideration in planning decisions. It advises local authorities to take into account the need to ensure that noisy and noise-sensitive developments are located away from each other to reduce the impact of noise.

13.43 It should be noted that aircraft noise is dealt with separately under Policies EP7 and EP8

POLICY EP6 GENERAL NOISE CONTROL

IN AREAS WHERE NOISE LEVELS ARE RELATIVELY HIGH, PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR NOISE-SENSITIVE DEVELOPMENTS ONLY WHERE ADEQUATE MITIGATION IS PROVIDED, OR THE IMPACT OF THE NOISE CAN BE REDUCED TO ACCEPTABLE LEVELS THROUGH BUILDING DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF DEVELOPMENT.

DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS THAT GENERATE SIGNIFICANT LEVELS OF NOISE MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A SCHEME TO MITIGATE SUCH EFFECTS, BEARING IN MIND THE NATURE OF SURROUNDING USES. PROPOSALS THAT WOULD HAVE AN UNACCEPTABLE IMPACT ON NOISE-SENSITIVE USES WILL NOT BE PERMITTED.

Aircraft Noise

13.44 As mentioned in the Economic Development Chapter, the Council supports the development of London Manston Airport as a regional airport.

13.45 Policy EP7 seeks to limit the effect of aircraft noise on sensitive development such as housing, schools and hospitals, by restricting locations where such development may be sited. PPG24

13.46 In 1995, the District Council commissioned production of aircraft noise contours by Arup showing predicted noise levels and based on a study of Manston Airport Traffic Forecasts by Alan Stratford Associates. The forecasts considered a range of high, medium and low traffic scenarios, including the possibility of increased aviation associated with the prospective major economic regeneration role of Central Thanet, and possible runway extension.

13.47 PPG24 indicates that in exercising planning control, regard should be paid not only to existing noise exposure but also any increase that may reasonably be expected in the foreseeable future. Noise predictions were prepared for the years 1996, 2000 and 2010.

13.48 At present, there is uncertainty regarding future aircraft noise levels at Manston. The Council is therefore adopting a precautionary approach in relation to aircraft noise, and for the purposes of Policy EP7, will continue to apply the 1996 (dBLAeq 16 hour) contour predictions, which formed the basis for the Policy in the adopted Local Plan, assuming the presence of military jets. However, the District Council will keep under review the need to consider adoption of alternative contour scenarios as circumstances develop, with quieter commercial aircraft entering service and civilian air activity increasing. Accordingly, because the contours may be subject to change within the Plan period, they are not featured on the Proposals Map, but reproduced separately as an Appendix.

13.49 As mentioned in the Economic Development Chapter, an agreement is being discussed with the Airport operators regarding future airport operations and related environmental impacts. In particular, this addresses the issue of aircraft noise, and noise abatement measures, and seeks a contraction in the aircraft noise contours from 2002.

Residential Development

13.50 PPG24 recommends particular noise ranges for each NEC, but indicates that local planning authorities may justify a range of NEC's of up to 3dB(A) (decibel incorporating frequency weighting) above or below those recommended. Because the air noise contours are based on a scenario assuming low growth, no runway extension and no night flights, the District Council has adopted a precautionary approach to safeguarding sensitive development from the effects of aircraft noise.

13.51 Therefore, while the NECs in Policy EP7 are essentially calibrated as recommended in PPG24, the upper limit of category "B" has been reduced to 63dB(A). This contour lies almost wholly outside the built up parts of the Thanet towns and villages. Restriction on residential development within this contour would not affect the ability to meet housing land provisions within the Local Plan period.

Other Noise-Sensitive Development

13.52 Noise sensitive non-residential development such as schools and hospitals may occupy large sites and include elements of varying sensitivity. The NEC principle cannot therefore be sensibly applied, and it is appropriate in such circumstances to refer to specific guidance on internal noise standards. In respect of aircraft noise, PPG24 advises that 60dB(A) should be regarded as a desirable upper limit for major new noise sensitive development.

POLICY EP7 AIRCRAFT NOISE

APPLICATIONS FOR NOISE SENSITIVE DEVELOPMENT OR REDEVELOPMENT ON SITES LIKELY TO BE AFFECTED BY AIRCRAFT NOISE WILL BE DETERMINED IN RELATION TO THE LATEST ACCEPTED PREDICTION OF EXISTING AND FORESEEABLE GROUND NOISE MEASUREMENT OF AIRCRAFT NOISE.

APPLICATIONS FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT WILL BE DETERMINED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE FOLLOWING NOISE EXPOSURE CATEGORIES.

NEC 

 PREDICTED
AIRCRAFT NOISE
LEVELS(dB(A)

A

 <57

 NOISE WILL NOT BE A DETERMINING FACTOR

B

 57-63

 NOISE WILL BE TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT IN DETERMINING APPLICATIONS, AND WHERE APPROPRIATE  CONDITIONS WILL BE IMPOSED TO ENSURE AN ADEQUATE LEVEL OF PROTECTION AGAINST NOISE (POLICY EP8 REFERS)

C

 63-72

 PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT NORMALLY BE GRANTED EXCEPT WHERE THE SITE LIES WITHIN THE CONFINES OF EXISTING SUBSTANTIALLY BUILT UP AREA OR ON A SITE ALLOCATED (H1) FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON THE PROPOSALS MAP. WHERE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT IS EXCEPTIONALLY GRANTED, CONDITIONS WILL BE IMPOSED TO ENSURE AN ADEQUATE LEVEL OF PROTECTION AGAINST NOISE (POLICY EP8 REFERS).

D

 >72

 RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT WILL NOT NORMALLY BE PERMITTED

APPLICATIONS FOR NON-RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT INCLUDING SCHOOLS, HOSPITALS AND OTHER USES CONSIDERED SENSITIVE TO NOISE WILL NOT BE PERMITTED IN AREAS EXPECTED TO BE SUBJECT TO AIRCRAFT NOISE LEVELS EXCEEDING 60 dB(A) UNLESS THE APPLICANT IS ABLE TO DEMONSTRATE THAT NO ALTERNATIVE SITE IS AVAILABLE. PROPOSALS WILL BE EXPECTED TO DEMONSTRATE ADEQUATE LEVELS OF SOUND INSULATION WHERE APPROPRIATE IN RELATION TO THE PARTICULAR USE.

POLICY EP8 AIRCRAFT NOISE & RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

WHEN PLANNING CONSENT IS GRANTED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON ANY LAND EXPECTED TO BE SUBJECT TO A LEVEL OF AIRCRAFT NOISE OF ABOVE 57dB(A)**, SUCH CONSENT WILL BE SUBJECT TO PROVISION OF A SPECIFIED LEVEL OF INSULATION TO ACHIEVE A MINIMUM LEVEL OF SOUND ATTENUATION IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:

NEC PREDICTED AIRCRAFT MINIMUM NOISE LEVELS ATTENUATION REQUIRED (dB(A) (FREQUENCY RANGE 100-3150 Hz)

<57

 NO ATTENUATION MEASURES NORMALLY REQUIRED

B

 57-63

 20dB

C

 63-72

 30dB

** LAeq 57dB 07.00-23.00

Operational Notes
13.53 For the purposes of Policy EP7, noise sensitive development/redevelopment includes residential, schools, hospitals, and any other use the function or enjoyment of which could, in the District Council's opinion, be materially and adversely affected by noise. 

13.54 The provisions of Policy EP8 will not apply to permissions relating to small extensions to existing houses provided:

(1) Permission for the construction of the house itself was not granted subject to the provisions of this Policy; or

(2) The extension is not intended to form a separate unit of living accommodation.

13.55 In such instances the sound insulation standards referred to in this Policy are brought to the attention of all applicants, but it is left to them whether they implement the standards within the new extension or not.

13.56 A guidance note which sets out brief specifications of works required to meet specific levels of sound attenuation (adapted from Building Research Establishment Digest 338) is available from the District Council. Alternative schemes can be considered where problems are likely to be encountered, eg: rooflights.

13.57 General information in respect of internal noise standards can be found in BS 8233:1987 (Sound insulation and noise reduction for buildings). Information for guidance about health and hospital buildings is available from NHS Estates; an executive agency of the Department of Health. The Department for Education publishes guidance for schools (Dept. of Education Design Note 17: Guidelines for Environmental Design in Educational Buildings).

Airport Public Safety Zones

13.58 In the past, Public Safety Zones (PSZs) around airports have been limited to the twenty largest airports in Great Britain. However, the PSZ policy is currently under review and zones are now identified on the basis of individual risk contours at a level of 1 in 100 000 of an incident occurring. The purpose of the zones is to prevent development that would result in a significant number of people being located within an identified risk contour. In recent years, however, PSZ policy has been reviewed, and PSZs are now identified on the basis of individual risk contours. The Zones represent a simplified form of the risk contours and take the form of elongated isosceles triangles based on the landing thresholds and tapering away from each end of the runway. Essentially, the purpose of the Zones is to minimise the number of people at risk of death or injury in the event of an aircraft crash on take-off or landing.

13.59 The draft DfT Circular 1/12/2002 on Public Safety Zones sets out a general presumption against development in the Zones, and in particular, dwellinghouses, mobile homes, caravan sites or other residential uses, or any non-residential development, except for certain low-density uses. This would preclude new schools, retail development, community facilities and other uses, but might allow, for example, lowdensity warehousing uses, surface car parking or public open space (without play facilities).

13.60 It is anticipated that London Manston Airport (LMA) will be the subject of a PSZ assessment in the new future, and a decision on whether a PSZ is appropriate for Manston (and the extent of such a Zone) is likely to be taken by DETR prior to any Inquiry into this Plan. London Manston Airport is likely to be subject of an assessment regarding a PSZ in 2003 at the earliest. The assessment is likely to be based on forecast levels of traffic for the year 2004. Should a PSZ be identified by the DoTR prior to the adoption of this plan, the extent will be shown on the proposals map. If a PSZ is identified at LMA, this may have consequences for other elements of the draft Plan.

Light Pollution

13.61 PPG23 refers to light as a potential source of pollution, and advises that local planning authorities should assess its impact on general amenity and the natural environment. The Council also recognises the need for lighting to provide security and public safety, and the potential civic amenity value.

13.62 However, poorly designed or installed lighting can result in light spillage beyond the site into residential areas or the countryside, and can produce sky glow, which introduces a suburban character into rural areas.

13.63 The rural landscape in Thanet is gently undulating, generally very open, and largely devoid of trees and other significant vegetation. Poor outdoor lighting could therefore have a substantial adverse effect on the character of the area well beyond the site on which it is located.

13.64 In 1994, the Institution of Lighting Engineers (ILE) produced the Guidance Notes for the Reduction of Light Pollution. This identifies 4 different "environmental zones" in which different standards of light reduction should be applied:

E1 – National Parks, AONBs and other "dark landscapes";
E2 – Areas of "low district brightness" – rural locations outside those identified above;
E3 – Areas of "medium district brightness" – urban locations; and
E4 – Areas of "high district brightness" – urban centres with high night-time activity.

13.65 It is for the Local Planning Authority to identify the relevant areas of the district to which the different standards would apply, and these zones are identified on the Proposals Map by way of reference to other policy areas. Thus in this Plan:

(1) Zone E1 comprises the Pegwell Bay Special Landscape Area and the former Wantsum Channel (as identified in Policy CC2);
(2) Zone E2 comprises the rest of the rural areas outside built confines (as identified by Policies CC1 and R1); except Manston Airport (as identified by Policy EC3);
(3) Zone E3 comprises the urban areas and rural settlements within built confines (as identified by Policies CC1 and R1), and Manston Airport (as identified by Policy EC3); and 
(4) Zone E4 comprises the amusement area at Margate Seafront (as identified by Policy T10).

13.66 Within these areas, the ILE advises the following standards:

OBTRUSIVE LIGHT LIMITATIONS FOR EXTERIOR LIGHTING INSTALLATIONS 

Envinonmental Zones Shy glow Light into windows Light into windows Source intensity Source intensity Building luminance Building liminance
Upward light ratio Before curfew After curfew Before curfew After curfew Before curfew Before curfew
[max %] Ev[lux] Ev[lux] I[kcd] I[kcd] Av.L(cd/m2) Max.L(cd/m2)

E1

 0

 2

 1*

 0

 0

 0

 0

E2

 2.5

 5

 1

 20

 0.5

 5

 10

E3

 5.0

 10

 2

 30

 1.0

 10

 60

E4

 15.0

 25

 5

 30

 2.5

 25

 150

*From public road lighting installations ONLY.

POLICY EP9 LIGHT POLLUTION

DEVELOPMENT THAT INVOLVES THE PROVISION OF NEW OUTDOOR LIGHTING SHOULD DEMONSTRATE THAT IT IS THE MINIMUM NECESSARY FOR SAFETY, SECURITY OR WORKING PURPOSES. SUCH DEVELOPMENT SHOULD SEEK TO MINIMISE THE DEGREE OF LIGHT GLARE, SPILLAGE AND TRESPASS AND SKY GLOW SO AS NOT TO RESULT IN THE LOSS OF RESIDENTIAL AMENITY, HARM THE CHARACTER OF VILLAGES OR THE COUNTRYSIDE, OR CAUSE DISTURBANCE TO IDENTIFIED WILDLIFE AREAS.

IN ORDER TO CONTROL THE IMPACT OF OUTDOOR LIGHTING SCHEMES, THE STANDARDS SET OUT IN THE INSTITUTE OF LIGHTING ENGINEERS’ "GUIDANCE NOTES FOR THE REDUCTION OF LIGHT POLLUTION" WILL BE APPLIED, AND PLANNING APPLICATIONS SHOULD INCLUDE ALL RELEVANT INFORMATION FOR CONSIDERATION.

DEVELOPMENT THAT IS CONSIDERED UNACCEPTABLE IN THESE RESPECTS WILL NOT BE PERMITTED.

Flood Risk Areas

13.67 New Government guidance in draft PPG25, July 2001, states that the objectives of sustainable development require action on development and flood risk to be based on the precautionary principle. It goes on to say that a sustainable approach to flooding may therefore involve the avoidance of development in areas at risk. Alternatively, where development needs to be located in particular areas, it should be appropriate to its location in the flood plain and have an appropriate level of protection to ensure that it is safe. A risk based approach and a sequential test will be applied prior to a decision relating the type of development that can be accepted to the degree of flood risk.

13.68 The Environment Agency’s "Policy & Practice for the Protection of Floodplains" (March 1997) also states that development should be guided away from areas at risk from flooding. The Agency recognises that, in some cases, development may sometimes have to be located in flood risk areas because of the nature of the use or the lack of alternative sites. In these circumstances, development should take account of all aspects of flood protection and prevention.

13.69 However, in Thanet, the main areas at risk of flooding are located in the former Wantsum Channel, away from the main population and service centres of the district. Consequently, the Council considers that the application of the precautionary principle leads to a highly restrictive approach to development in this flood risk area.

13.70 The flood risk area in Margate includes the Old Town area, which lies at the centre of the urban area and is an area identified for physical and economic regeneration. It also includes parts of Dane Valley along King Street, and the Dreamland Amusement Park and Tivoli Road areas. In these areas, the Council considers that commercial and residential development is acceptable, subject to full and proper safeguards in relation to flood risk.

13.71 These policies will obviously need to be regularly reviewed, as the evidence on the effects of global warming on future sea levels is refined and better established.

13.72 The District Council will consult the Environment Agency in respect of new development proposals, and developers and applicants are therefore strongly advised to contact the Environment Agency prior to submitting a planning application if flood risk is likely to be an issue. In line with appendix F of PPG25, the Environment Agency may recommend that a Flood Risk Assessment be undertaken prior to the submission of a planning application to ascertain the suitability of a site for development. For example, a plan of the site showing existing levels related to Ordnance Datum would help to establish the risk and depth of flooding at the site.

POLICY EP10 WANTSUM CHANNEL FLOOD RISK AREA

IN THE WANTSUM CHANNEL FLOOD RISK AREA, AS DEFINED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP, NEW RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT WILL NOT BE PERMITTED. 

OTHER DEVELOPMENT MAY BE PERMITTED WHERE IT RELATES TO THE REDEVELOPMENT OF EXISTING SITES WITH NO NET INCREASE IN BUILDING VOLUME AND SUBJECT TO THE PROVISIONS OF OTHER LOCAL PLAN AND STRUCTURE PLAN POLICIES.

ALL ASPECTS OF FLOOD RISK MUST BE ADDRESSED IN ANY NEW PROPOSALS. DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS WHICH WOULD INCREASE THE OVERALL RISK OF FLOODING, OR WOULD BE DETRIMENTAL TO THE INTEGRITY OF FLUVIAL, TIDAL AND SEA DEFENCES, WILL NOT NORMALLY BE PERMITTED. 

POLICY EP11 MARGATE FLOOD RISK AREA

IN THE MARGATE FLOOD RISK AREA, AS DEFINED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP, DEVELOPMENT WHICH IS LIKELY TO INCREASE THE OVERALL RISK OF FLOODING, INCLUDING THE CONSEQUENCES OF SURFACE WATER RUN-OFF, OR WHICH WOULD BE DETRIMENTAL TO THE INTEGRITY OF FLUVIAL, TIDAL AND SEA DEFENCES WILL NOT NORMALLY BE PERMITTED.

DEVELOPMENT WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED WHICH INCLUDES APPROPRIATE MITIGATING MEASURES TO OVERCOME THIS INHERENT RISK OF FLOODING AS DEFINED BY THE DISTRICT COUNCIL IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE ENVIRONMENT AGENCY AND FUNDED BY THE DEVELOPER.

RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT SHOULD BE OF OF THREE STOREY CONSTRUCTION WITH CAR PARKING AND UTILITY ROOMS AT GROUND FLOOR, LIVING ACCOMMODATION ABOVE AND SLEEPING ACCOMMODATION ON THE THIRD FLOOR. IF THIS IS NOT FEASIBLE FOR OTHER PLANNING REASONS THEN RESIDENTIAL ACCOMMODATION SHOULD BE OF AT LEAST TWO-STOREY CONSTRUCTION AND SHOULD NOT RESULT IN THE PROVISION OF SLEEPING ACCOMMODATION AT EITHER BASEMENT OR GROUND FLOOR LEVEL. IT MUST INCLUDE AN APPROPRIATE MEANS OF ESCAPE TO UPPER FLOOR LEVELS.

Surface Water Run-off

13.73 New development can increase the quantity and rate of flow of surface water runoff. In some parts of the district, surface water runoff is a potential problem, either in terms of flooding or other adverse effects on the water environment, such as the Stour Valley drainage system.

13.74 In cases where surface water run-off is considered to be an issue, appropriate attenuation measures will be required, such as sensitively designed balancing pools or other water flow control mechanisms to be jointly agreed with Thanet District Council, the Environment Agency and the statutory sewerage undertaker. The council will expect any measures for surface water control to be maintained in order to retain their long-term effectiveness.

13.74.1 The use of Sustainable Drainage Systems (SUDS) provides a significant contribution towards more sustainable development by managing environmental impacts at source rather than downstream or before it enters a watercourse. Encouragement will be given for the implementation of Sustainable Drainage Systems wherever practicable.

POLICY EP12 SURFACE WATER RUN-OFF

DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS THAT WOULD RESULT IN FLOODING, EXACERBATE FLOODING ELSEWHERE, OR HAVE OTHER ADVERSE EFFECTS ON THE WATER ENVIRONMENT, DUE TO SURFACE WATER RUN-OFF, WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED WHERE EFFECTIVE PREVENTATIVE MEASURES CAN BE INCORPORATED INTO THE DEVELOPMENT.

Water Supply

13.75 The Environment Agency has recently published its Regional Water Resources Strategy for the South East developed with the water companies and the Government’s industry regulator, OFWAT. The strategy looks 10 to 25 years ahead and covers all aspects of water resources management, including public water supply. This considers a range of measures to ensure sufficient water supply and match supply to the pattern of need.

13.76 The District Council also supports the proposed new measures designed to ensure the security of a long-term reliable water supply to East Kent. The Council would support the provision of a new reservoir at Broad Oak Water near Canterbury in the future, if this were required in the long term.

13.77 However, other measures, including demand management, leakage control and inter-regional transfer should be considered prior to proceeding with the development of Broad Oak Water. Any such development at Broad Oak would require an Environmental Statement. In the short and medium term, the District Council acknowledged that the provision of water supply will be met through measures which include demand management, leakage reduction and inter company transfers where possible.

Groundwater Protection Zones

13.78 Damage to water resources may occur due to the physical disturbance of aquifers and groundwater flows by quarrying, new mineral workings, infill of old mineral workings, road construction, etc; or through contamination by waste disposal on land, industrial processes, disturbance of existing contaminated land, etc. It is therefore essential that adequate measures are undertaken to protect surface and groundwater resources.

13.79 There is also concern that, with declining underground water source reserves, this supply is more susceptible to pollution, whether from agricultural chemicals, industrial waste, or other contaminants. It is therefore all the more important that preventable water source pollution through necessary development does not occur.

13.80 These groundwater sources require protection from potentially polluting development, and Policy EP13 will therefore apply in these areas. In applying this Policy, the Council will consult the Environment Agency, and developers and applicants are strongly advised to contact the Environment Agency prior to submitting a planning application if groundwater protection is likely to be an issue.

13.81 The Environment Agency has developed a "Policy and Practice for the Protection of Groundwater". This seeks to ensure that new development does not present an unacceptable risk to groundwater resources or lead to a deterioration in the quality or potential yield of groundwater, and recommends appropriate protection measures for different classes of potentially polluting development.

13.82 The District Council will therefore normally expect new development to meet the requirements of the Environment Agency so as to ensure that such development will not lead to a material deterioration in the quality of surface or ground water.

13.83 The Environment Agency's Guidance Notes on "Protecting the Water Environment through Development Plans" (originally produced by the NRA) is available from the Environment Agency Southern Region Office in Worthing, West Sussex.

POLICY EP13 GROUNDWATER PROTECTION ZONES

IF A PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT IN THE GROUNDWATER PROTECTION ZONES IDENTIFIED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP WOULD HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO RESULT IN A RISK OF CONTAMINATION OF GROUNDWATER SOURCES, IT WILL NOT BE PERMITTED UNLESS ADEQUATE MITIGATION MEASURES CAN BE INCORPORATED TO PREVENT SUCH CONTAMINATION TAKING PLACE.

Wastewater Treatment Facilities

13.84 The treatment of wastewater in Thanet is carried out by Southern Water Services. The Weatherlees Hill Wastewater Treatment Works at Ebbsfleet is now in operation, and should bring considerable improvements to the quality of bathing water and to wildlife habitats. Southern Water is continuing to invest in new plant to provide better treatment facilities for wastewater and to improve bathing water quality, for example, at Weatherlees Hill and Foreness Point.

13.85 It is not anticipated that further works will be needed within the Plan period to meet the requirements of the EU Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive. However, the Policy is retained in this Plan to provide for any unanticipated proposals for such facilities. Southern Water has a statutory duty to provide wastewater infrastructure to serve new and existing development to meet standards set under environmental legislation by the Environment Agency. Development defined within the local plan or higher statutory environmental standards may require additions to wastewater treatment capacity in Thanet.

13.86 Where a need for such facilities is identified, the District Council will assist Southern Water in identifying appropriate new sites, and will support such facilities, where there is no significant detrimental impact on other aspects of the Thanet environment, as reflected in the policies of this Plan.

POLICY EP14 WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITIES

THE PROVISION OF IMPROVED ADDITIONAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITIES WILL BE SUPPORTED SUBJECT TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY CONSIDERATIONS OF THIS PLAN.

Renewable Energy and Recycling

13.87 Government policy PPG22 is to stimulate the exploitation of renewable energy technology, in order to help reduce emissions harmful to the environment and to husband finite energy resources. The location and geographical characteristics of Thanet are potentially conducive to the technological development and exploitation of many known sources of renewable energy. (as demonstrated in the South East Renewable Energy Resource Assessment 2000).

13.88 The District Council generally supports the harnessing of renewable energy sources and efficient energy production technology including recycling to produce energy from waste and re-use of waste*. The Council also recognises the potential for energy saving measures in the location and design of new development. However, the benefits of efficient and renewable energy production need to be balanced against their environmental impacts. In many instances, environmentally sensitive sites may also be the most efficient location for renewable energy technology.

13.89 The level of impact will vary according to location (for example, much of the Thanet coast is a designated SPA/Ramsar site, candidate Special Area of Conservation and Site Of Special Scientific Interest, in which extremely sensitive control is required). Level of impact will also vary according to the scale and nature of development. (Proposals may range from individual household applications for small solar heating panels, new development designed/orientated so as to exploit passive solar energy, to large-scale projects capable of contributing to energy requirements of the wider community through established networks).

POLICY EP15 RENEWABLE ENERGY

PROPOSALS FOR DEVELOPMENT NECESSARY FOR THE EXPLOITATION OF RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES OR ENERGY-SAVING TECHNOLOGY INCLUDING RECYCLING AND ENERGY FROM WASTE* WILL BE CONSIDERED IN RELATION TO THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:

(1) THE POTENTIAL CONTRIBUTION OF THE DEVELOPMENT TO NATIONAL, REGIONAL AND LOCAL REQUIREMENTS FOR RENEWABLE/ENERGY EFFICIENT ENERGY PRODUCTION;

(2) THE GENERAL IMPACT OF THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT IN TERMS OF LOCATION, APPEARANCE, SIZE, NOISE AND VIBRATION; AND 

(3) SENSITIVITY OF PROPOSED LOCATION INCLUDING IN TERMS OF LANDSCAPE CHARACTER,  LANDSCAPE QUALITY, CULTURAL HERITAGE, FLORA, FAUNA AND WATER RESOURCES.

13.90 *(The County Council is the responsible planning authority for deciding "County matter" waste applications [ie proposals for waste management, including deposit of refuse or waste materials or erection of buildings, plant or machinery designed to be used for treating, storing, processing or disposal of refuse or waste]. Specific policies relating to recycling of waste and energy production from waste are to be found in the Kent Waste Local Plan).

Richborough Power Station

13.91 Richborough Power Station, which is situated at the boundary with Dover District, is a substantial complex of buildings in a sensitive landscape area (see Policy CC2) and adjacent to a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). Nearby is Pegwell Bay, a Special Protection Area (SPA), Ramsar Site and two candidate Marine Special Areas of Conservation (SAC). The site also lies adjacent to the River Stour, and proposals will also need to be weighed against policies for protection of the river corridor, water quality protection and flood risk area. Consent from the Environment Agency would be required for works within 15 metres of the top of the river bank.

13.92 The Power Station is allocated in the Kent Waste Local Plan as a location suitable in principle for:

(1) preparation of category A (inert) wastes (eg builder's waste) for re-use (Policy W7vc); 
(2) separation and transfer of category B & C (degradable and putrescible wastes) as a step towards reduction in their use, re-use and recycling (Policy W9); and 
(3) waste to energy plant (Policy W11).

13.93 The District Council supports such allocation in principle, provided that such development would not have an unacceptable impact (including on landscape, wildlife, water resources, flooding, archaeology and traffic generation). A full assessment of the ecological, hydrological, archaeological and landscape impacts on the environment will be required. The Richmond site is located in close proximity to national and international sites of nature conservation interest necessitating the identification of all potential mechanisms of impact on sensitive receptors.  Appropriate safeguarding policies are included in the Waste Local Plan and these were formulated in consultation with the District Council. Policy EP15 indicates that the District Council generally supports proposals associated with renewable/efficient energy production. The Policy is considered to provide sufficient guidance in relation to this particular site that may be particularly conducive to such proposals.

13.94 It is recognised that certain proposals may arise which do not fall within the scope of Policy EP15, nor fall to be determined by the County Council as Waste Local Planning Authority. It is considered that existing Policies contained within this Plan provide adequate guidance in respect of other proposals that might arise during the Plan period.

TARGETS

LP Implementation Target

Policy

 Area Derelict & Contaminated Land

Relevant

 Policies EP4

Indicator

 Level of compliance with provisions of Policy EP4 during Plan period

Target

 100% compliance with Policy EP4

Monitoring

 Through DC Applications system in conjunction with Environmental Health

LP Implementation Target

Policy

 Area Aircraft Noise Impacts

Relevant Policies

 EP7   EP8

Indicator

 Level of compliance with provisions of Policies EP7 and EP8 during the Plan period

Target

 100% compliance with Policies EP7 and EP8

Monitoring

 Through DC Applications system in conjunction with Environmental Health

LP Implementation Target

Policy

 Area Wantsum Channel Flood Risk Area

Relevant Policies

 EP11 EP10

Indicator

Number of dwellings permitted within Flood Risk Area during Plan period

Target

 Nil during Plan period

Monitoring

 Through DC Applications system

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